Synaptotagmins: That’s why so many

C. Chen, P.M. Jonas, Neuron 94 (2017) 694–696.

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Journal Article | Published | English
Department
Abstract
Synaptotagmin 7 (Syt7) was originally identified as a slow Ca2+ sensor for lysosome fusion, but its function at fast synapses is controversial. The paper by Luo and Südhof (2017) in this issue of Neuron shows that at the calyx of Held in the auditory brainstem Syt7 triggers asynchronous release during stimulus trains, resulting in reliable and temporally precise high-frequency transmission. Thus, a slow Ca2+ sensor contributes to the fast signaling properties of the calyx synapse.
Publishing Year
Date Published
2017-05-17
Journal Title
Neuron
Volume
94
Issue
4
Page
694 - 696
ISSN
IST-REx-ID

Cite this

Chen C, Jonas PM. Synaptotagmins: That’s why so many. Neuron. 2017;94(4):694-696. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2017.05.011
Chen, C., & Jonas, P. M. (2017). Synaptotagmins: That’s why so many. Neuron, 94(4), 694–696. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2017.05.011
Chen, Chong, and Peter M Jonas. “Synaptotagmins: That’s Why so Many.” Neuron 94, no. 4 (2017): 694–96. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2017.05.011.
C. Chen and P. M. Jonas, “Synaptotagmins: That’s why so many,” Neuron, vol. 94, no. 4, pp. 694–696, 2017.
Chen C, Jonas PM. 2017. Synaptotagmins: That’s why so many. Neuron. 94(4), 694–696.
Chen, Chong, and Peter M. Jonas. “Synaptotagmins: That’s Why so Many.” Neuron, vol. 94, no. 4, Elsevier, 2017, pp. 694–96, doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2017.05.011.

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