Activity-dependent dendritic spine neck changes are correlated with synaptic strength

R. Araya, T.P. Vogels, R. Yuste, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111 (2014) E2895–E2904.


Journal Article | Published | English
Author
Araya, R.; Vogels, Tim PIST Austria; Yuste, R.
Abstract
Most excitatory inputs in the mammalian brain are made on dendritic spines, rather than on dendritic shafts. Spines compartmentalize calcium, and this biochemical isolation can underlie input-specific synaptic plasticity, providing a raison d'etre for spines. However, recent results indicate that the spine can experience a membrane potential different from that in the parent dendrite, as though the spine neck electrically isolated the spine. Here we use two-photon calcium imaging of mouse neocortical pyramidal neurons to analyze the correlation between the morphologies of spines activated under minimal synaptic stimulation and the excitatory postsynaptic potentials they generate. We find that excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitudes are inversely correlated with spine neck lengths. Furthermore, a spike timing-dependent plasticity protocol, in which two-photon glutamate uncaging over a spine is paired with postsynaptic spikes, produces rapid shrinkage of the spine neck and concomitant increases in the amplitude of the evoked spine potentials. Using numerical simulations, we explore the parameter regimes for the spine neck resistance and synaptic conductance changes necessary to explain our observations. Our data, directly correlating synaptic and morphological plasticity, imply that long-necked spines have small or negligible somatic voltage contributions, but that, upon synaptic stimulation paired with postsynaptic activity, they can shorten their necks and increase synaptic efficacy, thus changing the input/output gain of pyramidal neurons.
Publishing Year
Date Published
2014-07-15
Journal Title
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Volume
111
Issue
28
Page
E2895-E2904
ISSN
eISSN
IST-REx-ID

Cite this

Araya R, Vogels TP, Yuste R. Activity-dependent dendritic spine neck changes are correlated with synaptic strength. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 2014;111(28):E2895-E2904. doi:10.1073/pnas.1321869111
Araya, R., Vogels, T. P., & Yuste, R. (2014). Activity-dependent dendritic spine neck changes are correlated with synaptic strength. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(28), E2895–E2904. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1321869111
Araya, R., Tim P Vogels, and R. Yuste. “Activity-Dependent Dendritic Spine Neck Changes Are Correlated with Synaptic Strength.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111, no. 28 (2014): E2895–2904. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1321869111.
R. Araya, T. P. Vogels, and R. Yuste, “Activity-dependent dendritic spine neck changes are correlated with synaptic strength,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 111, no. 28, pp. E2895–E2904, 2014.
Araya R, Vogels TP, Yuste R. 2014. Activity-dependent dendritic spine neck changes are correlated with synaptic strength. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 111(28), E2895–E2904.
Araya, R., et al. “Activity-Dependent Dendritic Spine Neck Changes Are Correlated with Synaptic Strength.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 111, no. 28, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2014, pp. E2895–904, doi:10.1073/pnas.1321869111.
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