Patterns of diversification in two species of short-tailed bats (Carollia Gray, 1838): the effects of historical fragmentation of Brazilian rainforests.

A. Pavan, F. Martins, F. Santos, A. Ditchfield, R.A. Fernandes Redondo, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 102 (2011) 527–539.

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Journal Article | Published | English
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Abstract
The small-sized frugivorous bat Carollia perspicillata is an understory specialist and occurs in a wide range of lowland habitats, tending to be more common in tropical dry or moist forests of South and Central America. Its sister species, Carollia brevicauda, occurs almost exclusively in the Amazon rainforest. A recent phylogeographic study proposed a hypothesis of origin and subsequent diversification for C. perspicillata along the Atlantic coastal forest of Brazil. Additionally, it also found two allopatric clades for C. brevicauda separated by the Amazon Basin. We used cytochrome b gene sequences and a more extensive sampling to test hypotheses related to the origin and diversification of C. perspicillata plus C. brevicauda clade in South America. The results obtained indicate that there are two sympatric evolutionary lineages within each species. In C. perspicillata, one lineage is limited to the Southern Atlantic Forest, whereas the other is widely distributed. Coalescent analysis points to a simultaneous origin for C. perspicillata and C. brevicauda, although no place for the diversification of each species can be firmly suggested. The phylogeographic pattern shown by C. perspicillata is also congruent with the Pleistocene refugia hypothesis as a likely vicariant phenomenon shaping the present distribution of its intraspecific lineages.
Publishing Year
Date Published
2011-02-10
Journal Title
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society
Volume
102
Issue
3
Page
527 - 539
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Pavan A, Martins F, Santos F, Ditchfield A, Fernandes Redondo RA. Patterns of diversification in two species of short-tailed bats (Carollia Gray, 1838): the effects of historical fragmentation of Brazilian rainforests. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. 2011;102(3):527-539. doi:10.1111/j.1095-8312.2010.01601.x
Pavan, A., Martins, F., Santos, F., Ditchfield, A., & Fernandes Redondo, R. A. (2011). Patterns of diversification in two species of short-tailed bats (Carollia Gray, 1838): the effects of historical fragmentation of Brazilian rainforests. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 102(3), 527–539. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2010.01601.x
Pavan, Ana, Felipe Martins, Fabrício Santos, Albert Ditchfield, and Rodrigo A Fernandes Redondo. “Patterns of Diversification in Two Species of Short-Tailed Bats (Carollia Gray, 1838): The Effects of Historical Fragmentation of Brazilian Rainforests.” Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 102, no. 3 (2011): 527–39. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2010.01601.x.
A. Pavan, F. Martins, F. Santos, A. Ditchfield, and R. A. Fernandes Redondo, “Patterns of diversification in two species of short-tailed bats (Carollia Gray, 1838): the effects of historical fragmentation of Brazilian rainforests.,” Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, vol. 102, no. 3, pp. 527–539, 2011.
Pavan A, Martins F, Santos F, Ditchfield A, Fernandes Redondo RA. 2011. Patterns of diversification in two species of short-tailed bats (Carollia Gray, 1838): the effects of historical fragmentation of Brazilian rainforests. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. 102(3), 527–539.
Pavan, Ana, et al. “Patterns of Diversification in Two Species of Short-Tailed Bats (Carollia Gray, 1838): The Effects of Historical Fragmentation of Brazilian Rainforests.” Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, vol. 102, no. 3, Wiley-Blackwell, 2011, pp. 527–39, doi:10.1111/j.1095-8312.2010.01601.x.

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